Law of Peace(making) and Children's International Human Rights

Introducing a stream of working papers and forthcoming monograph by Sarah M. Field (sarah@rights-streams.com) born of a probe of peace processes from a juristic, human rights and child rights perspective.  Cf. related blog streams (general and Syria-specific) and three part working paper stream on Law of Peace(making) and the Right to have Rights.

 
 
Flickr Picture, Chris Linag.

Flickr Picture, Chris Linag.

Law of Peace(making) and Children's International Human Rights (Cambridge Open Book Publishers, Forthcoming).

A critical and constructive probe of peace processes from a juristic, human rights and child rights perspective. 

Cf. Silvia Carolina Parra Semolina, 'Re-Imaginando Procesos de Paz con Niños, Niñas y Adolescentes'  Boletín Pútchipu 27:10-11 (December 2014), [ Summary of Chapt. 7 of related doctoral probe of peace processes focusing specifically on the international legal obligation to assure respect for children's views].


Law of Peace(making) and Children's Right to have Rights, June 2017.

Held within the staged process of peacemaking is a promise of a new beginning. It is latent within its sui generis legal form, and the often layered human rights transformation at its substantive epicentre. For the most part, children are invisible in the successive agreements that constitute peacemaking. Yet there is an international legal obligation to affirm children’s legal standing as subjects of human rights in relation to the successive processes, and makes those rights effective ‘in’ and ‘through’ the resultant agreements. The paper aims to support the process of seizing ‘the radical progressive potential of peace processes’ for children. Towards this aim it draws on and distills the findings of connected probes of peace processes from a child rights perspective and develops them with regard to broader scholarship on human rights and children’s rights. It offers six suppositions as to why children are mostly invisible in peacemaking and concludes by inverting these into six principles for giving effect to children’s rights in and through peacemaking.

Cf. Principles on Giving Effect to Children Rights in and through Peacemaking; and Working Paper Stream on the Right to have Rights: Law of Peace(making) and the Right to have Rights, July 2017; and Law of Peace(making) and Women's Right to have Rights, July 2017.


UN Picture, N/a.

UN Picture, N/a.

Intra-Syria Talks, Politicking and Possibility for Syria's Invisible 43%, January 2017, [Revised Version of Paper Presented at the Third International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Children and War (Salzburg, July 13-15, 2016)].  

The ongoing Syrian  peace process typifies the extremity of children’s invisibility in peacemaking. To date, children — 43% of the population — are mostly invisible within the peace agreements that constitute the process. Yet there is an international legal obligation to affirm children’s legal standing and agency as subject of human rights in relation to the successive processes and make those rights effective through the resultant agreements. The paper aims, first, to critically probe the peace process from a juristic, human rights and child-rights perspective and, second, apply the findings of connected probes (see papers below) to the context and thereby, illuminate the legal and political opportunities for ensuring the process is constitutive of children’s rights. 

Cf. Principles on Giving Effect to Children Rights in and through Peacemaking; Law of Peace(making) and Children's International Human Rights (Cambridge Open Book Publishers, Forthcoming); and Law of Peace(making) and Children's Rights to have Rights, June 2017.